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Study of Weight Loss as a Model for Clinical Research
 
  Quantity in Basket: None
Code: DJ 13.2(3)
Price: $9.50
 
 
  This publication is for individual use. Please email info@thebowencenter.org or call the Center at (202) 965-4400 for volume pricing or permission to distribute for educational purposes.
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Study of Weight Loss as a Model for Clinical Research: Shifts in the Family System, the Subject's Functioning, and the Course of Clinical Symptoms
Laura Havstad, PhD and Kathleen J. Sheffield, MS, MA, RD


Clinical sciences have not yet systematically tested the potential of Bowen family systems theory to understand and predict the course of a wide range of clinical symptoms. This is a progress report on the development and application of a reliable method to document the emotional impact of the family system on clinical subjects and the course of their symptoms over time. A systematic method of analyzing data from family evaluation interviews has been developed to track shifts in the family emotional system associated with weight loss in overweight and obese individuals. The method produces a timeline of shifts in the family system, shifts in the functioning and anxiety levels of subjects, and changes in subjects’ weight. Four studies are described that illustrate and support the development and use of the method. It is hoped that this framework will encourage the practice of tracking the family system as a variable in mainstream clinical research, especially in studies of the course of symptoms and treatment outcomes over time and across a broad range of clinical disorders.



For more information, please contact The Bowen Center at 202-965-4400 or info@thebowencenter.org